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Posts Tagged ‘leadership’

Inspire Mondays ONE… Who’s Watching You?

Do you know who is watching your fitness life and goals?

Brain workout

 

The FitRanX “INSPIRE” value means that you are taking others along with you.

If you’re motivated, you’re doing this whether you know it, or not.

If you’re getting traction and results, people are paying attention.

(If you’re not getting results, we need to talk! Contact us on our Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/fitranx and let us know what you need to see!)

The question is, are you letting others into your fitness success?

It’s a matter of effectiveness in leadership and INSPIRATION.

This is the basis for the following blog series. Think of your fitness life as a business.

You are the “entrepreneur” of your body and how well you inspire others to their fitness potential.

Lesson One: The Law of the Lid

jars

The ability to lead is the “lid” that determines a person’s effectiveness.

The lower an individual’s ability to lead, the lower the lid on his potential.

The better a person is at leading, the higher the lid on his potential for achievement.

Can a restaurant – one of the most successful restaurants of all time – teach us anything about our personal effectiveness?

The restaurant: McDonald’s. The answer: yes, and the key is that they weren’t always so successful.

Some key partners in the restaurant had a very specific “lid” on their leadership potential.

If they can learn this lesson and become a multi-billion dollar conglomerate, we’re betting you can inspire others to get fit.

A Huge Ship with No One at the Helm?

You are the creator

In the 1930s, Dick and Maurice McDonald opened one of the first fast food restaurants.

By the mid-‘50s, their annual revenue was $350,000, and they took home about $100,000 each year.

But despite their success, they were not true leaders.

They tried to franchise their restaurants, but sold only 15 licenses, of which only 10 became actual restaurants.

In contrast, Ray Kroc joined them in 1954 and proved himself a powerhouse of leadership.

He assembled a team of the sharpest people he could find, worked hard, and sacrificed for the business.

In 1961, he bought the McDonald brothers out for $2.7 million.

Today, the company has 34,000 stores in 119 countries.

The McDonald brothers’ weak leadership put a lid on their ability to succeed.

Everywhere you look, you can find examples of success being limited by lack of leadership.

For example, Steve Wozniak was the brains behind Apple in the 170s, but his leadership lid was low.

By contrast, Steve Jobs’ leadership lid was high, and he built a world-class organization out of Apple.

To apply the law, take a look at the following steps.

Lesson 1

Once you’ve done this, check back with us for Law TWO: The Law of Influence.

Stay tuned for our next law to succeed in your fitness “entrepreneurship!”

If you want some extra accountability on this, leave the answers to the 4 questions below and we’ll help you keep track.

Adapted-from-21

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